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Motorcycle accidents may not occur more frequently than any other kinds of accidents, but the injuries that result from a motorcycle crash are often more serious and more likely to result in death simply based on the lack of protection a bike provides in a collision. Recently, a left turn accident took the life of a north suburban Cook County man when an SUV turned left in front of his motorcycle at an intersection at Sheridan Road near Michigan Avenue in Wilmette.

A great number of accidents involving motorcycles happen when a car makes a left turn in front of a bike. This may be due to drivers not seeing or perceiving motorcycles on the road as compared to other cars. Drivers involved in a crash often say they did not see the motorcycle. Since motorcycles are so much smaller than cars, drivers may be looking past them in anticipation of seeing other cars. Whatever the case may be, drivers should be mindful that they are sharing the road with riders as well as other cars.

Although it may not be possible to always protect yourself from someone else’s negligence, there are precautions that motorcyclists can take that may help save lives too. Wearing bright colors or reflective clothing can increase the chances that drivers will see a rider. Keeping a bike’s headlight on at all times can also raise a rider’s visibility. Some bikes have automatic day-time running lights. In fact, Illinois law requires motorcycles to have their headlights on while operating. Motorcyclists should also be prepared to sound their horn when they need to get a driver’s attention quickly and to let them know they are there. Reducing accidents in the first place is the best way to avoid injury or death.

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Adams County health officials have reported that two more victims of a Legionnaires’ disease outbreak at the Quincy Illinois Veterans’ Home died as a result of the disease, bringing the overall death toll to nine.

The local health department is still investigating the source of the outbreak that has caused over 50 residents to become ill.

Legionnaires’ disease can be caused by bacteria formations in improperly maintained water systems in buildings. The bacteria can be carried in water vapor that a person might inhale causing a number of symptoms, some of which are similar to pneumonia.

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Four patients at the Quincy Veterans Home in Quincy, Illinois have died during an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease. According to the Adams County Health Department, twenty-five other patients at the home have tested positive for Legionella, the bacteria that causes Legionnaires’.

People with respiratory illnesses and the elderly are at greater risk of contracting Legionnaires’ disease as well as suffering from complications associated with this affliction. County officials are still working to determine if any other residents who may be affected.

The bacteria that causes Legionnaires’ may be found in improperly maintained water and plumbing systems. A person can become infected by breathing in water vapor contaminated with the bacteria according the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Jared Fogle became famous as a spokesperson for the Subway sandwich restaurant chain when he lost a significant amount of weight by switching from junk food to eating only Subway. What came as a surprise to many was a news story that broke in July of this year, when FBI and local police searched Fogle’s Indiana home in relation to a child pornography investigation, after which the former pitchman’s public image irreversibly changed.

Today in Federal Court in Indianapolis, Fogle pleaded guilty to charges of of possession of child pornography as well as having sexual contact with minors as part of a plea deal cut with prosecutors. He is expected to serve up to 12 years in prison.

Nothing can reverse the devastation caused to victims of childhood sexual abuse and their families. While criminal laws are meant to protect the public from these types of horrible acts, victims may also be entitled to compensation from their abusers.

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The Chicago Department of Public Health confirmed that a person living at a rehab facility in Chicago’s Gold Coast has died of legionella. Officials from the department have not yet confirmed the source of the bacteria.

Legionella is known as the bacteria that causes Legionnaires’ disease. This type of bacteria can be found in water systems, such as improperly maintained plumbing, hot-water tanks, or cooling towers. People who contract the disease can exhibit symptoms similar to those of pneumonia.

Early detection is important to treatment and preventing others from becoming exposed.

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The Will County Sheriff’s office reported that a teacher’s aide at Lincoln Way West High School in Suburban New Lenox was charged with two counts of criminal sexual assault of a female student who was between the ages of 13 and 17.

The aide allegedly communicated with the underage student through social media before having sexual contact with her at his home.

There are several statutes in Illinois that provide immunity to schools for certain types of legal claims. However, under certain circumstances, courts have allowed cases to proceed pursuant to exceptions to the immunity statute. For example, a school board may be liable for willful and wanton acts in relation to a failure to supervise school activities.

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Most states require drivers to buy car insurance. The logic behind this rule is that most people wouldn’t be able to afford to pay the damages that could result from a car accident. Imagine getting into a wreck with someone driving a really expensive car. Even if it was just a fender bender, the cost of repairing the other driver’s fancy ride could break your budget.

This equation works the opposite way too. Insurance is there to protect you in case you were involved in an accident caused by someone else’s negligence. But, what if that person’s insurance limits aren’t enough to cover your damages? After all, we can’t control what insurance policy the driver who hit us decided to buy.

This is where Illinois law steps in with a protection for insurance purchasers who find themselves in precisely this type of situation. But, it’s important to know the rules in order to make sure they’re working for you.

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Prosecutors in Winnebago County, Illinois have charged David Seaton, 51 a Winnebago resident with as many as 11 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse as well as one count of predatory sexual assault.

Seaton was first charged with one count related to a 3 year old victim at his wife’s home-based day care business. The additional charges came after four other children came forward.

The Illinois Department of Children and Family Services is currently directing operation of the day care. Seaton’s wife is not suspected of any crimes and her day care has currently been allowed to stay open.

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At about 1:15 early Sunday morning two cars collided in Chicago’s Chinatown neighborhood after one of the drivers failed to stop at a red light. Two people were injured in the crash, including an off duty police officer.

The condition of those injured has been reported as stable.

To contact attorney Joseph Klest about this post, click here, or call 312-380-5467.

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There are more cameras in public places now then there ever were before, and camera footage is often used to aid police in criminal investigations. Increasingly though, accident victims are also benefiting from the use pictures and video from public cameras in their cases.

Take, for instance, a car accident that occurs at an airport departure drop-off point. Or, a collision near a Chicago street camera. Many municipalities put cameras inside buses and trains that are part of a city’s public transportation system.

With the advent of digital video, it has become much easier and more practice to store large amounts of data. However, digital storage is not infinite. Because video can only be stored for a limited time to make room for future footage, it is important to act fast to preserve evidence in an accident case.